Monitor File or Directory Changes in Linux with Systemd

To track changes to the Linux file system and report changes to apps, the inotify kernel subsystem can be used. For example, when a file or directory is created, modified, read, or deleted, inotify allows a specific action (command, script) to be executed.

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Stop Receiving Reminders from Deleted Calendar in Outlook

Some people find that they still get popup reminders for some events even after they have deleted some events from their Outlook calendar, or even after removing the entire calendar. The problem occurs with deleted and canceled meetings in the Outlook desktop client when you have mailboxes hosted on the Exchange Server orĀ  Microsoft 365.

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Fix: apt-get – there is no public key available

An error may occur when updating the apt deb package manager cache on Linux (Ubuntu or Debian distros):

$ apt-get update

W: There is no public key available for the following key IDs: 467B942D3A79BD29
W: GPG error: https://repo.mysql.com/apt/ubuntu focal InRelease: The following signatures couldn't be verified because the public key is not available: NO_PUBKEY 467B942D3A79BD29

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Configure Local DNS Caching on Linux

On most modern Linux distros, you can enable the local caching of DNS queries by using the built-in systemd-resolved service. In this article, we will take a look at how to speed up the resolution of DNS queries by using systemd-resolved local client caching on Debian and Ubuntu. This allows you to reduce DNS resolution delays if you have an unstable network connection, when DNSSEC is enabled, and on hosts that make a large number of DNS queries (for example, mail servers).

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Configure Network Settings on Ubuntu (Network Manager, Systemd and Netplan)
Modern versions of Ubuntu offer many different ways to configure network settings, and it’s easy to get confused. In this article, we will have a look at how to configure network settings in Ubuntu using Network Manager, Systemd Networkd, Netplan, and the static configuration file /etc/network/interfaces (legacy way).

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